The Teacher Who Believes Math Equals Love : NPR Ed : NPR

The best and most effective educators are the ones who have genuine passion for the students that they are trying to reach out to and of course, the subject that they teach.

We can plan and come up with a ton of research based curricular innovations but it’s great teachers who make the most impact.

Another example of Math, Music and love for both would be Vi Hart. An amazing woman!

The Teacher Who Believes Math Equals Love : NPR Ed : NPR.

Beyond Passion: The Science of Loving What You Do – Study Hacks – Cal Newport

Beyond Passion: The Science of Loving What You Do – Study Hacks – Cal Newport.

Everything is sort of like a chain of events with me and it always ends with a book purchase for my Kindle. The specific post above (and the book I bought) was triggered by a different post at ma.tt talking about finding three hobbies (which I think should really be four).

So I read the quote, thought about it, wrote on the comments section, did a search on Google to find out who the quote belonged to (unknown), ended up finding this piece that I am reposting here and finally, purchased the book “Drive” by Daniel H. Pink.  One of the reviews I read described it as “rhetorical yet incoherent” but I was very interested in the book because of this other snippet of review that I read:

“He does get the big picture right. He says that people would prefer activities where they can pursue three things.  Autonomy: People want to have control over their work.  Mastery: People want to get better at what they do.  Purpose: People want to be part of something that is bigger than they are.”

The above quote definitely resonates with me because I am at that cusp of this career/decision making process and it sums up what I am looking for (and will hopefully find).

Beyond Passion: The Science of Loving What You Do - Study Hacks - Cal Newport

xkcd.com – Randall Munroe

Why deep learning is at least inspired by biology, if not the brain

Gigaom

As deep learning continues gathering steam among researchers, entrepreneurs and the press, there’s a loud-and-getting-louder debate about whether its algorithms actually operate like the human brain does.

The comparison might not make much of a difference to developers who just want to build applications that can identify objects or predict the next word you’ll text, but it does make a difference. Researchers leery of another “AI winter” or trying to refute worries of a forthcoming artificial superintelligence worry that the brain analogy is setting people up for disappointment, if not undue stress. When people hear “brain,” they think about machines that can think like us.

On this week’s Structure Show podcast, we dove into the issue with Ahna Girschick, an accomplished neuroscientist, visual artist and senior data scientist at deep learning startup Enlitic. Girschick’s colleague, Enlitic Founder and CEO (and former Kaggle chief scientist) Jeremy Howard, also joined us…

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Why deep learning is at least inspired by biology, if not the brain

Gigaom

As deep learning continues gathering steam among researchers, entrepreneurs and the press, there’s a loud-and-getting-louder debate about whether its algorithms actually operate like the human brain does.

The comparison might not make much of a difference to developers who just want to build applications that can identify objects or predict the next word you’ll text, but it does make a difference. Researchers leery of another “AI winter” or trying to refute worries of a forthcoming artificial superintelligence worry that the brain analogy is setting people up for disappointment, if not undue stress. When people hear “brain,” they think about machines that can think like us.

On this week’s Structure Show podcast, we dove into the issue with Ahna Girschick, an accomplished neuroscientist, visual artist and senior data scientist at deep learning startup Enlitic. Girschick’s colleague, Enlitic Founder and CEO (and former Kaggle chief scientist) Jeremy Howard, also joined us…

View original post 731 more words

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler Defends His Net Neutrality Proposal

TechCrunch

Today, in a speech at the Silicon Flatirons Center in Boulder, Colorado, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler gave a detailed defense of his net neutrality plan. His proposed set of regulations concerning the open Internet will come to a vote before the Commission on the 26th of this month.

Since the Chairman unveiled the broad strokes of his plan last week, he has come under fire for being, roughly, either a puppet dancing on the strings of the President, or, someone who is the Physical Embodiment of government run amok, out to cut the legs off of both Internet innovation and investment into the core physical mesh that constitutes the Web.

Poppycock, to summarize, is Wheeler’s response to his critics.

Digging into his remarks — the full text can be found here — let’s take a few sections as both argumentatively interesting, and funny.

To begin, here is Wheeler responding to criticism that…

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Cheers to the FCC for Supporting Title II to Protect the Open Internet

Just in case I haven’t mentioned it recently…..:)
(Have to do my part!)

Transparency Report

WordPress.com aims to democratize publishing – to build the tools that give writers, bloggers, and creators of all sizes a way to get their voices to the world. Today we see that our voices were heard, and that they had a big impact on the future of the internet.

This morning, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler announced his support for strong network neutrality rules, by proposing to reclassify internet service under Title II of the telecommunications act. We applaud Chairman Wheeler for today’s announcement. It’s a historic step, and one that would not have been possible without the support of the millions of internet users – from individual WordPress.com bloggers to the President of the United States – who voiced their support for the open internet for the past several months. At Automattic, we’re proud to have participated in this historic effort, and pledge to continue supporting this important cause…

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